Couldn't Have Done It Without You

To all the drivers (senior/novice) that came out and helped on the turns for the Enduro...... OMG Thank You!!!!

We knew going into the event that our worker count was going to be very low. Had you drivers not stepped up to the plate, I don't know what the outcome would have been.

Kudos to IRDC for getting the word out.

I have only been on the ICSCC circuit for 7 years and I have never seen so many drivers come out to help. It was awesome.

I hope you had a good time (even though you weren't in a race car) and will now spread the word to other drivers, to come on out on a weekend they aren't racing and lend a hand.

This weekend was a WIN WIN scenerio, as I learned new things to watch for from the 2 drivers I worked with and they in turn learned a few things from me. It all goes towards being more aware and safer for all.

So once again, Thank You, and I can't encourage you all enough to give your member club a hand with bringing in new people not just as future drivers, but as volunteers.

See you all in Portland.

Lynn Rimmer
ICSCC ROD Director

(and Bob, I hope you still have the smile on your face from doing the DOVER)
 

M3BEEF

Member
Women and Men in White Know How to Have a Great Time!

The smile IS still on my face--The DOVER/Monkey wave was a perfect end to a fun, exciting, and educational day!

Get out there everyone, you don't know (or may have forgotten) what you are missing.

I'm fully impressed by the professionalism and friendliness of everyone within Conference...thanks for letting me be a part of it!
 

mark_higinbotham

Active member
They've Got Your Back

I too must echo the sentiments mentioned above. I had the privilege of working Turn 6 with Lynn and Bob the "beef" Wellington. While we had great fun and a ringside seat to fantastic racing, we were also impressed with the top notch professionals who "Have our Backs" as racers week after week. The unfortunate accident of Michael McAleenan was handled with swift, calm, precision. Everyone knew their job and executed it. Fortunately no one was injured and the racing resumed seamlessly. I have also had the privilege of setting in at Race Control and was amazed at the constant awareness of each and every car on track (I can't get away with anything!). So to my fellow racers I say, go ahead and work a turn when ever you can. You may pick up some tips on a new line but for sure you will gain some appreciation for the selfless professional volunteers that "Have Your Back" week after week!
 

ACphotography

Active member
IMG_0656-1.jpg


Everyone hard at work! Thanks everyone.
 

robjacobsen

The Pros From Dover
IMG_0656-1.jpg


Everyone hard at work! Thanks everyone.

What's wrong with this picture?

The concrete barrier in that picture is not pinned to the ground. The guy sitting on the armco has his legs between a rock and a hard place, just waiting for a spinning car to clap them together. Can you say "sandwich"? Note that the flaggers are on their feet and at a pair of eyes are facing up track and will be elsewhere long before a spinning car can get to them. Glad things went ok up there. Wish there hadn't been a conflict, but those things seem to be happening more and more in recent years.
 

ACphotography

Active member
I believe I took this photo before the start of the race. Also he's just a quick pivot turn from being in a hard place to being open space. If he would have been more left I would have agreed with you. I've seen photographers stand there before and even farther left than him. I do feel turn 9 corner spot is just a dangerous place for the corner workers in general and I think all the others standing there would have time to do is duck.
 
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Richard Broadhead

Flag & Com
Turn 9 can intimidate some people because you are pretty close to the cars. However for a car to impact right there he would have to be out of control almost at the turn in point for the corner or before it. The more likely error is, cutting the apex too tight and impacting the inner wall then, shooting off left past the workers and on in to the drag strip barrier. Most things that 'go wrong' at 9 result in cars ending up beyond the turn station.

Mid 1990's and up till some time in early 2000's, we worked Turn 9 from the 'other side of that grand stand. Tucked in at the back bottom behind the drag strip snack bar. I always felt that was a 'safer' location for the workers but, it lead to some radio problems from the steel grand stand so somebody decided to move the workers. Yes, that current location is 'more' of a hazardious place then the other side and the blue flagger MUST be watchful.
 

ACphotography

Active member
I always wondered why they didn't do it from the grand stand side. If there was a ladder sort of thing for the flags like they have at Portland it wouldn't be too hard to have the station to the left of the grandstands in the picnic area right there. Not sure if that'd be far enough away from the stands though.
 

Richard Broadhead

Flag & Com
I always wondered why they didn't do it from the grand stand side. If there was a ladder sort of thing for the flags like they have at Portland it wouldn't be too hard to have the station to the left of the grandstands in the picnic area right there. Not sure if that'd be far enough away from the stands though.

Yup that picnic area next to the drag strip snack bar is where the 'flag station' used to be. SAME line of sight (no need for a ladder) for the drivers to see the flags 'directly' in front of them The workers can still see ALL the way around T-9 to T-10. At one time there was 'talk' of putting an antenna up on top of the grand stand and plugging the radio in to it. Good comm. and the station would remain behind that grandstand. Never happened, obviously.

As the E-crew is stationed right at the base of the tower, they can reach a driver in trouble on the that side of the grandstand 'almost' as fast as the turn workers can.

Although I questioned the 'move' my questions fell on deaf ears as I have no authority to do anything except complain (that I'm pretty good at).
 
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ACphotography

Active member
I think we may be talking about two different sides. I'm talking about the side at the bottom of the photo and if I'm not mistaking you're talking about the site at the top of the photo?

IMG_0668-1.jpg
 

Simon Tuman

Well-known member
thats me sitting. one of the few moments i got to sit in my 4 (more like 6) hours volunteering.... i think the picture is deceiving in how much room there is. Scott would've warned me if that wasnt a good place to sit. I learned a lot from him, especially being my first time out there.
 
Well, I always tell the people on my turn, that you can run away/react quicker if you're standing than if you're sitting.

We haven't seen everything a race car can do or where a race car can land, as they can and will continue, to defy all laws of physics.

Simon, what you learned from Scott will certainly be beneficial when you get your race car out there. (And ya, being on your feet all day is just one of the perks to volunteering lol)
Thanks for coming out. I hope you will do it again on a full race weekend. (That's a whole new kettle of fish.) 12 car grids or 50 car grids....really keeps you on your toes.
 

Richard Broadhead

Flag & Com
Yup, I'm talking abou the left edge of the Kawasaki sign. Being on 'this side' (the apex side) would make it difficult to see aroudn the corner and all the way to T-10. Cars tend to come to rest against that outer wall when in trouble exiting T-9. It would also be impossible to get out of that picnic area to aide a driver at rest nearby.
 
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